It all started with a French cake and some plastic wrap. Yummly publishes original recipes translated from top food bloggers who post in other languages: These are some of my favorites, because they've often got a new technique or an ingredient I've never heard of in the mix.

That was the case with one particular orange cake - from French blog On dine chez Nanou - because the first step involves wrapping oranges in plastic and boiling them. And then you put the whole oranges — peel, seeds and all — into the batter.

That can't be right, right? Wrong: It turns out there are both classic French and Italian cakes that involve cooking whole oranges and then whirring them into a moist, orangey batter for cake.

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The resulting cake is moist and very orangey. Photos by Miha Matei Photography.

So naturally, we did some fiddling. I didn't want to eat anything that involved boiling plastic, but I love oranges...and cake. I contacted recipe developer and kitchen coach Tory Davis to test it out, tweak it and come up with something wonderful.

OrangeCakeWholeOranges

Yep, you put the whole thing in the food processor (or blender).

Boy did she ever. Even better, her version of the recipe made it even weirder: It contains Jägermeister. Yes, the booze you overdid at that one high school party. The botanicals add complexity (plus it's fun).

OrangeCakeBatter

Lots of eggs make the final cake taste like a fallen souffle (without the anxiety).

The resulting cake is delicious: Moist, marmalade-y, bitter and bright all at once. This is a treat that calls out for sweetened whip cream and shot of espresso. Or Jäger, we don't judge.

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The batter goes straight from the food processor to the cake pan.

Check out the whole recipe, and Tory's story about its creation, here

Light Orange Cake (from Yummly)

Orange Cake